Tag Archives: Shakespeare

Show off your short story

When asked what makes a short story so special, most authors would mention the simplicity and directness of plot. Joseph O’Connor sums it up well – “A good short story is almost always about a moment of profound realization. Or a hint of that. A quiet bomb.”

Over time I realized that a short story has to be a ‘packaged reading delight’. Small nuances make the difference; such as creating a comfortable ambiance on your page would make readers rate you higher. Pay attention to the backdrop, the font and the color combinations to ensure they’re easy on the eyes. Also maintain a frequency of writing; it increases and retains readers. Try putting up an image of yourself (the author) on your blog/page which suits the general voice of your stories. It makes your readers think of you as someone they would bond with over coffee.

You can try using tools to market and make sure that your page/blog stays in line with what readers want. CreateSpace provides an excellent platform where you can upload your work and get feedback on it, customize publishing and eBook distribution and market it as per your convenience.  You can use Duotroupe as well, to keep updated about the markets, preferences, deadlines and events revolving around short stories.

Short stories form a very competitive field of literature. Most short story competitions are easy to participate in, the contests are handled online entirely and the prize is quite bountiful. Listings for all contests can be found on BookTrust, which also provides you with its own upload library as well as feedback from recognized authors.

If you want to be the next Miroslav Penkov (2012 BBCISSA winner), get started writing and posting. It’s ‘East meets West’ today, but soon it could be your short story that walks away with the grand prize.

Tweet me your comments @tallenge

– Ayesha
Tiny Tallenger

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Twitterature – Classics In Under 140 Characters!

If you’re one of the people who find novels and classics boring, we have just the thing for you – Twitterature. A narrative form paying tribute to brevity and talent using social media as a portal for readership.

Two teenagers from the University of Chicago undergrads Emmet Rensin and Alexander Aciman came up with their own means of celebrating 80-odd classics by abridging and parodying them in 20 tweets each. The result is a book published by Penguin, titled Twitterature. And how does Shakespeare’s Hamlet sound in it? – “Ophelia just pulled a Virginia Woolf. Funeral is on the morrow.”

It is a very different take to the perspective with which we would tend to read, say, Oedipus the King. The 140-character limit has transformed writing and penmanship. Never before was a novel condensed to 20 tweets using current day lingo. Authors such as Arjun Basu, who has written over 1,000 twisters, and  VeryShortStory have managed to capture and hold the interest of avid Tweeps who now no longer need to go through the cumbersome process of reading the entire book but finish a short story in the blink of an eye.

A lot of new websites seem to have taken it upon themselves to ensure that this transformation in literature rendition continues. Storify is one such example. It creates a simple editors board on which you pick out a theme or an event, write out your tweets and establish a plot. Editing is a piece of cake and you can add pictures and videos. And voila, you have a story that is interactive and the length of which no longer bores the readers. The story is time efficient and so very precise in what it chooses to convey.

Guess what’s the newest bit of literature to turn into Twitterature – it’s poetry! Lyricism, rhyme and rhythm captured in 140 characters, details of which I shall discuss in my next post. Sounds challenging? Turn to TwitLit, all ye writers of lore.

Tweet me your comments @tallenge

– Ayesha
Tiny Tallenger

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