Twitterature – Classics In Under 140 Characters!

If you’re one of the people who find novels and classics boring, we have just the thing for you – Twitterature. A narrative form paying tribute to brevity and talent using social media as a portal for readership.

Two teenagers from the University of Chicago undergrads Emmet Rensin and Alexander Aciman came up with their own means of celebrating 80-odd classics by abridging and parodying them in 20 tweets each. The result is a book published by Penguin, titled Twitterature. And how does Shakespeare’s Hamlet sound in it? – “Ophelia just pulled a Virginia Woolf. Funeral is on the morrow.”

It is a very different take to the perspective with which we would tend to read, say, Oedipus the King. The 140-character limit has transformed writing and penmanship. Never before was a novel condensed to 20 tweets using current day lingo. Authors such as Arjun Basu, who has written over 1,000 twisters, and  VeryShortStory have managed to capture and hold the interest of avid Tweeps who now no longer need to go through the cumbersome process of reading the entire book but finish a short story in the blink of an eye.

A lot of new websites seem to have taken it upon themselves to ensure that this transformation in literature rendition continues. Storify is one such example. It creates a simple editors board on which you pick out a theme or an event, write out your tweets and establish a plot. Editing is a piece of cake and you can add pictures and videos. And voila, you have a story that is interactive and the length of which no longer bores the readers. The story is time efficient and so very precise in what it chooses to convey.

Guess what’s the newest bit of literature to turn into Twitterature – it’s poetry! Lyricism, rhyme and rhythm captured in 140 characters, details of which I shall discuss in my next post. Sounds challenging? Turn to TwitLit, all ye writers of lore.

Tweet me your comments @tallenge

– Ayesha
Tiny Tallenger

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One thought on “Twitterature – Classics In Under 140 Characters!

  1. Gunnar says:

    A good companion article, dove-tailing Vine as the visual form of Twitter-based literature, has been posted by @RitaJKing on http://t.co/tI5AHhqwjt

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